By Adrienne Gaffney

In 1957, renowned architect Richard Neutra built a hillside home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., for John Rados, a fellow Austrian immigrant, and his wife. ‘They wanted a very clean, simple house. Simple in that it was very smooth lines and stuff like that,’ says their grandson, Bob Rados, Jr. His grandfather was a shipbuilder and owner and president of Harbor Boat Building Co., which built military vessels during World War II.

The home is being sold outside the Rados family for the first time. Mr. Rados’s parents moved into it in 1978 after the death of his grandparents and lived there until his mother died in October.

In around 1984, Mr. Rados’s parents did a small addition that added 300 square feet to the home, as well as an indoor Jacuzzi, bringing the house to 5,185 square feet. ‘They added to the back and it was very easy. They kept with the same lines and everything’s exactly the same,’ says Mr. Rados.

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By Emma Sarappo

If you’re searching for an older home with plenty of history, I might not initially stand out. After all, I was built in 1957, which is quite young in a dense field of 18th- and 19th-century architecture. But when you step back and take a real look at me, my clean lines and welcoming corners will blow you away. I’m an example of the best of Southern California’s Midcentury Modern architecture, and I happen to be one of the largest homes my architect, Richard Neutra, built in North America. Now I’m looking for someone new to fill my over 5,000 square feet of space.

If you know about Modernism, you understand that its global impact on art and architecture is immense, even though it’s a more recent movement than other famous and influential styles.

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By Neal J. Leitereg

At just over 5,000 square feet, this postwar residence by Richard Neutra is among the largest homes designed by the modernist architect in the U.S.

Named for its original owner, shipbuilder John Rados, the striking two-story surveys the Port of Los Angeles from its hillside vantage in Rancho Palos Verdes. Among features of the house are marine-grade mahogany beams, floor-to-ceiling windows and period fireplaces. A porthole window and door procured from one of Rados’ projects were also integrated into the design.

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A massive modernist, the Rados House is up for grabs in Rancho Palos Verdes. The home was designed by Richard Neutra and at 5,000 square feet, it remains the architect’s largest residential property. It was built for shipbuilder John Rados in 1957 and features original mid-century details like mahogany marine-grade wood beams, terrazzo floors, and wood paneling. The interior includes 3 bedrooms and 4 bathrooms along with two dining rooms and a lower level bar that opens out onto the poolside terrace. Although floor-to-ceiling windows are found throughout the dwelling, expansive glazing encases the main living area to offer sweeping views of the Los Angeles basin and the San Jacinto Mountains in the distance.

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By Claudine Zap

A Richard Neutra–designed home in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, is available for sale for the first time since it was built in 1957. It’s listed for $4.1 million.

–The Austrian-born Neutra “helped define modernism in Southern California and around the world,” the Los Angeles Conservancy asserts. The modern architect’s iconic properties include the Chuey Residence in Los Angeles and the Kaufmann House (built for the same man who commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater) in Palm Springs.

As the tale goes, the Kaufmann House, with its walls of glass and transition to the outdoors, caught the eye of shipbuilder John Rados. He asked Neutra to build him a home on a hillside from which he could look over his company, Harbor Boat Building, as well as the Port of Los Angeles. 

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By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

The Rados House is one of the largest Neutra-designed residences in the United States.

Located in Rancho Palos Verdes, a suburb of Los Angeles, the Rados House was designed by Richard Neutra in 1957 for John Rados, a prolific shipbuilder and the owner of Harbor Boat Building Company. Set at the end of a long, private driveway, the 4,000-square-foot home is carved out of the hillside and enjoys a spectacular, 270-degree view of the entire Los Angeles Basin.

For Rados—whose family fled the Austro-Hungarian Empire—Neutra’s iconic designs embodied, “postwar unpretentiousness, technological advances, and adaptability to a newly redefined world.”

The three-bedroom, four-bathroom home features an open floor plan with an upper-level living room, a television room, two dining areas, and a lower-level family room complete with a fireplace and a full bar.

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By Miles Thompson

Richard Neutra’s colossal Rados House has hit the market in Los Angeles’ Rancho Palos Verdes for $4.1m.

The sprawling, three-bedroom modernist property was designed by Neutra in 1957 for shipbuilder John Rados and unfurls across 4,000 sq ft, making 2209 Daladier Drive one of the architect’s biggest private residencies. It’s now on the market via Deasy Penner Podley.

Neutra’s signature floor-to-ceiling glass walls are used throughout Rados House to capture far-reaching views of the Los Angeles basin and the San Gabriel and San Jacinto Mountains. Rooms have a cache of original features including mahogany beams, terrazzo floors and wood-panelled interior walls.

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By Elijah Chiland

Famous modern architect Richard Neutra was extremely adept at maximizing the views from the stylish midcentury residences he designed throughout Southern California.

This Rancho Palos Verdes home, which, per the listing, is one of the largest houses built by Neutra, is no exception. Perched on a hillside overlooking Catalina Island and the Port of Los Angeles, it’s a terrarium-like structure with open living spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows throughout.

Constructed in 1957, the house was built for shipbuilder John Rados and has a simple post and beam design that includes multiple indoor-outdoor access points and an enormous upper level deck that wraps around the living room.

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By Claudine Zap

 It takes a sizable imagination to look at an industrial warehouse and envision it as a perfect family home. But that’s exactly what visual effects designer Ash Beck did when he bought a warehouse in Hermosa Beach, CA. He transformed what was once the location of a microchip manufacturer into a luxurious loft-style retreat. The stunning conversion is now available for $2.75 million.

Beck, who purchased the property in 1998, says the initial challenge was “getting the plans approved by the city, because they initially wanted the structure torn down and a new conforming house constructed.”

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