By Pauline O’Connor

Architects love to live and build in Silver Lake — everybody from John Lautner and Richard Neutra in the ’30s and ’40s to, decades later, Michael Rotondi and Barbara Bestor, have designed homes for themselves in the neighborhood’s hills.

More recently, Annie Ritz and Daniel Rabin, XTEN Architecture and Bestor alums who founded their own firm, And And And Studio, in 2017, have worked on three different living spaces for themselves in Silver Lake. The husband-and-wife duo’s latest and most extensive personal project, 1655 North Benton Way, is now on the market half a mile south of the Silver Lake Reservoir.

When the couple acquired the property in 2017, it contained a generic 1950s stucco box measuring just over 1,300 square feet. This was taken down to the studs and transformed into a board-and-batten-clad structure that wraps around its front courtyard in an L shape, with the longer section holding the bedrooms and bathrooms and the shorter section containing the kitchen, dining, and living areas. Oversize glass sliders connect the house with its courtyard and rear swimming pool while keeping the rooms suffused with natural sunlight.

To read the full article visit their website here.

By Lauren Beale

Tucked into the hills of southwest Pasadena is the 45-home Poppy Peak neighborhood, named for its highest point and the flowers that grew wild there.

The land was purchased in 1924 by developer William Carr, who mapped out the residential lots and built his own home. The Roaring ‘20s were well underway, Calvin Coolidge was president and a first-class stamp cost 2 cents.

An early Carr neighbor built this Spanish Colonial in 1929. Stylistically, it is somewhat of a rarity among the historic district’s defining Modernist houses, designed by architects including Richard Neutra and Lyman Ennis, that sprang up from the 1930s through the 1960s.

The restored and updated multistory home is walled and gated at the street with a front-facing garage. The new garage door is an exact replica of the original.

To read the full article visit their website here.

High on a bluff in Pacific Palisades is a narrow, hedged lane off of Chautauqua Boulevard that contains some of the most radical and important 20th Century residential architecture in the country– a cluster of Case Study House projects, instigated in the late ’40s by Art + Architecture Magazine’s John Entenza and designed by Richard Neutra, Eero Saarinen (with Charles Eames) and Rodney Walker, culminating in Ray and Charles Eames’ own residence in a grove of eucalyptus.

The 3-bed, 2.5-bath Rodney Walker Case Study House #18– Also known as the West House after the original owners and with spectacular views of Santa Monica and the Pacific Ocean– is for rent for $20,000 a month.

To read the full article visit their website here.

On the evening of December 8th, historian and author Dr. Barbara Lamprecht will speak on “Neuroscience and Neutra: 70 Years Ahead of His Time;” her doctoral dissertation exploring Richard Neutra’s roots in neuroscience and landscape. This unique opportunity is not one to be missed as the lecture will take place at one of Neutra’s architectural marvels; The Lovell Health House. The Lovell Health House was designed and built by Neutra between 1927 and 1929 in the modernist International Style. The home is often cited as the first steel frame house in the United States. Lecture attendees will have the chance to explore the unique home as well as hear a talk from the house’s preservationist, Josh Gorrell. The talk will focus on the history of the Lovell House and its place within the movement of Modernist architecture.

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By Emma Sarappo

If you’re searching for an older home with plenty of history, I might not initially stand out. After all, I was built in 1957, which is quite young in a dense field of 18th- and 19th-century architecture. But when you step back and take a real look at me, my clean lines and welcoming corners will blow you away. I’m an example of the best of Southern California’s Midcentury Modern architecture, and I happen to be one of the largest homes my architect, Richard Neutra, built in North America. Now I’m looking for someone new to fill my over 5,000 square feet of space.

If you know about Modernism, you understand that its global impact on art and architecture is immense, even though it’s a more recent movement than other famous and influential styles.

To read the full article visit their website here.

By Miabelle Salzano

The current asking price for the 5,185-square-foot residence is $4.1 million.

In the mid-1900s, successful shipwright John Rados purchased a 1.268-acre hillside lot that would allow him to look out over the Port of Los Angeles where his company, Harbor Boat Building Co., operated. Soon thereafter, Rados commissioned famed modernist Richard Neutra to design a house for the site. “For Rados, Neutra’s designs embodied postwar unpretentiousness, technological advances, and adaptability to a newly redefined world,” a current real estate listing writes. In 1957, Neutra completed the 5,185-square-foot residence offering Rados 270-degree views of the city through its floor-to-ceiling windows.

Elements of Rados’ livelihood are prominently featured through the house, including marine-grade mahogany wood beams, Terrazzo flooring, and a repurposed porthole window and door from one of the Harbour Boat Building Co.’s ships that serve as a doorway to an oversized swimming pool. The house’s expansive windows dominate much of the house’s stone and slatted wood siding façade.

To read the full article visit their website here.

By Neal J. Leitereg

At just over 5,000 square feet, this postwar residence by Richard Neutra is among the largest homes designed by the modernist architect in the U.S.

Named for its original owner, shipbuilder John Rados, the striking two-story surveys the Port of Los Angeles from its hillside vantage in Rancho Palos Verdes. Among features of the house are marine-grade mahogany beams, floor-to-ceiling windows and period fireplaces. A porthole window and door procured from one of Rados’ projects were also integrated into the design.

To read the full article visit their website here.

A massive modernist, the Rados House is up for grabs in Rancho Palos Verdes. The home was designed by Richard Neutra and at 5,000 square feet, it remains the architect’s largest residential property. It was built for shipbuilder John Rados in 1957 and features original mid-century details like mahogany marine-grade wood beams, terrazzo floors, and wood paneling. The interior includes 3 bedrooms and 4 bathrooms along with two dining rooms and a lower level bar that opens out onto the poolside terrace. Although floor-to-ceiling windows are found throughout the dwelling, expansive glazing encases the main living area to offer sweeping views of the Los Angeles basin and the San Jacinto Mountains in the distance.

To read the full article visit their website here.

By Claudine Zap

A Richard Neutra–designed home in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, is available for sale for the first time since it was built in 1957. It’s listed for $4.1 million.

–The Austrian-born Neutra “helped define modernism in Southern California and around the world,” the Los Angeles Conservancy asserts. The modern architect’s iconic properties include the Chuey Residence in Los Angeles and the Kaufmann House (built for the same man who commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater) in Palm Springs.

As the tale goes, the Kaufmann House, with its walls of glass and transition to the outdoors, caught the eye of shipbuilder John Rados. He asked Neutra to build him a home on a hillside from which he could look over his company, Harbor Boat Building, as well as the Port of Los Angeles. 

To read the full article visit their website here.

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

The Rados House is one of the largest Neutra-designed residences in the United States.

Located in Rancho Palos Verdes, a suburb of Los Angeles, the Rados House was designed by Richard Neutra in 1957 for John Rados, a prolific shipbuilder and the owner of Harbor Boat Building Company. Set at the end of a long, private driveway, the 4,000-square-foot home is carved out of the hillside and enjoys a spectacular, 270-degree view of the entire Los Angeles Basin.

For Rados—whose family fled the Austro-Hungarian Empire—Neutra’s iconic designs embodied, “postwar unpretentiousness, technological advances, and adaptability to a newly redefined world.”

The three-bedroom, four-bathroom home features an open floor plan with an upper-level living room, a television room, two dining areas, and a lower-level family room complete with a fireplace and a full bar.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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