1341 Sierra Alta Way 1_ErbeBlackham_midcentury_Hollywood_Hills_1341_Sierra_Alta_Way

Photography by Shawn Bishop

After several years of fine-tuning design and careful renovation, a mid-century tree house is being listed on the market for the first time. Designed by Douglas A. Brown and commissioned for the Freund couple in 1952, this home was intended to display their art collection after years of traveling the world. Since the inception of the home, their family grew to five members thus forcing the owners to expand and repurpose the space. Later, two architect firms, Liberstudio and Matlin & Dvoretzky, were hired and did a scrupulous job at making the home adaptable for three children.

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Paul R. Williams, FAIA, 1894-1980 | The Paul R. Williams Residence, Historic Lafayette Square, Los Angeles

Paul Revere Williams, FAIA is arguably one of this country’s most notable black architects. Born and raised in Los Angeles, and an orphan by the age of 4, Williams went on to become the first black student to graduate from USC – which he did in 1919 with a degree in architectural engineering. Fresh out of college, he was appointed to the LA City Planning Commission and worked under a number of prominent architects before starting his own practice in 1922. A year later he became the first black member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

The R.N. Williams Residence, 1948 | Ontario, CA

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photo by Jim Riche

Long heralded as the quintessential destination for midcentury-modern architecture, the city of Palm Springs boasts homes built by star architects such as Richard Neutra, John Lautner, Albert Frey, and William F. Cody. But a few miles east lies the city of Rancho Mirage, another architectural destination ready to step out of the shadow cast by its flashy neighbor. In a new book titled ‘Mod Mirage,’ writer and photographer duo Melissa and Jim Riche pay homage to the desert enclave in the first publication to focus on the city’s architectural legacy. In the early 1950s, Rancho Mirage was transformed from a mostly barren desert landscape into the Thunderbird and Tamarisk country clubs. As Riche explains in the introduction to ‘Mod Mirage,’ “They introduced the revolutionary concept of building homes on golf courses—a model that was soon adopted around the world.” Bing Crosby, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz were some of the stars to inhabit Thunderbird while Frank Sinatra settled at Tamarisk. The likes of William F. Cody, Donald Wexler, William Krisel, E. Stewart Williams, and William Pereira designed many of the structures built on or near the Thunderbird and Tamarisk country clubs. ‘Mod Mirage’ features stunning photographs of these iconic structures along with fascinating historical information regarding the oasis-like Rancho Mirage community.

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By Elijah Chiland

This extraordinary post and beam residence in Pasadena was built in 1957 and remains in great enough shape that the city honored it with a preservation award in 2012.

Designed by the architectural firm of Conrad Buff, Calvin Straub, and Donald Hensman, the house rises two stories and features walls of glass throughout the double-height living area. It’s got three bedrooms and three bathrooms spread across 1,885 square feet of living space.

Other features include beamed ceilings, built-in shelving and cabinetry, glass doors, and a handsome brick fireplace in the living room. The house has also recently been updated with new plumbing, electrical, and climate control; and the kitchen has been equipped with new appliances, though it retains plenty of midcentury style.

To read the full article visit their website here

By Elijah Chiland

One of Los Angeles’s few remaining Case Study houses is looking for a new owner.

Designed by Rodney Walker, Case Study House No. 18 (aka West House), was built in 1948 as part of the Case Study program, sponsored by Arts & Architecture. The influential series transformed modern architecture and helped make Los Angeles into an important center of postwar homebuilding and midcentury design style.

To read the full article visit their website here

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

One of the most architecturally significant residences currently on the market, the Koerner House encapsulates desert modernism.

Built in 1955, the Koerner House was designed by renowned architect E. Stewart Williams, whose distinct midcentury modern style significantly shaped the Coachella Valley’s architectural landscape. His commissions included the Frank Sinatra Housethe Edris House, the Santa Fe Savings and Loan (now the Palm Springs Museum Architecture and Design Center), and the Palm Springs Art Museum. Another masterwork by Williams, this sprawling Palm Springs beauty located at 1275 South Calle De Maria is now being offered for $3,350,000.

To read the full article visit their website here

By Jack Flemming

Film editor Angus Wall has paid $6.5 million for a cinematic Midcentury Modern home in Pacific Palisades, records show.

Sitting on a two-parcel bluff overlooking the ocean, the scenic spot takes in panoramic ocean views.

To read the full article visit their website here

By Philip Ferrato

Where: 3986 Clayton Avenue, Franklin Hills
When: Open on Sunday, November 5 from 1:00pm-4:00pm
Asking: $1,785,000
What: A wonderfully quirky cottage designed by architect Stephen Alan Siskind in 1963, this 3-bed, 2-bath home has a vibe that immediately draws you back to a long-lost bohemian Mid-Century Los Angeles. The main living space, with angled walls and and a roof supported by curving ribs, could be a chapel or an overturned wood boat– either way, it’s a joyous space to be in, and connected to the outdoors.

To read the full article visit their website here

By Philip Ferrato

Where: 616 Cold Canyon Road, Calabasas
Asking: $1,695,000
What: A 1966 Post + Beam design by Mid-Century architect Doug Rucker, built in 1966 and sensitively remodeled by  David Hertz, FAIA, a few years ago. It’s an exceptional 3-bed, 2-bath structure made even more special in this setting of boulders and ancient oaks.

To read the full article visit their website here.

Tucked into Calabasas’s Monte Nido neighborhood, this lovely, circa-1970s post and beam residence blends into the native oak trees that surround it. Designed by Malibu architect Douglas Rucker, it was recently renovated by Staples Center architect Dan Meis, who is also the current owner.

The single-story house employs walls of glass, skylights, and clerestory windows to bring the outdoors in. The wood-heavy interiors plus the tree grove views give the house a very cabin-like feel, but updates keep things fresh.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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