By Philip Ferrato

With almost 6000-square-feet, this 5-bed, 6-bath home (plus a pool and poolhouse) in Pasadena’s Oak Knoll could be described as a party giver’s paradise. Massed in a trio of connected stucco pavilions, the steeply pitched whitewashed spaces are softly illuminated by skylights, ready to be filled with friends. And uniquely, the superb quality of light comes from an industrial product– structural glass– set in the walls and gables.

Developed in the 1930s in Germany and France, structural glass was originally designed to admit light into factories and stairwells, and unlike window glass, it’s translucent (thus inexpensive to produce) and frameless, yet sturdy enough to provide strength of its own in a masonry structure. Rediscovered in the 1980s “High Tech” era, for the past two decades structural glass been prized by architects– such as Lorcan O’Herlihy– in Southern California for its seismic stability, translucence and vertical pattern.

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